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Riverbed of Thoughts
By Paul C. Howell
riverbed of thoughts

 

Riverbed of Thoughts is the second of five novels about John Chauncy and his friends Dorothea, Pedro, Midge and the others, from age six to the end of the 1900s. They are now in university in the USA and Europe facing the cold war, relationships, money and power. And now comes Vietnam.

Interview with Paul Charles Howell

Paperback, 724 Pages

Price: $29.75

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Eustis Circle
By Paul C. Howell
eustis circle

 

Eustis Circle is the first of five novels about life in Northeastern North America in the last five decades of the 20th century. It tells the story of John Chauncey and his friends. They grow up after WW2 in the McCarthy years and struggle with freedom, conformity, friends and neighbors, abuse, poverty and great wealth but grow up and learn to love reality. Some of them will turn out to be ordinary and others will show exceptional talents. Because of certain shared experiences in the early school grades, they will remain lifelong friends. The book takes off somewhere between the Hardy Boys and Robert Musil’s Toerless and soars into the unique world of John Chauncey. Other books by Paul C. Howell include Joseph’s Hardware (HT/TH Press), Politics of Joy (Alter Ego Press), Black as Hair White as Bone (Poems) and The Montreal Olympics (McGill-Queen’s University Press). 

Interview with Paul Charles Howell

  • Paperback, 480 Pages
  • Price: $24.50

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  • eBook (PDF), 230 Pages
  • Price: $13.23
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Joseph's Hardware
By Paul C. Howell
joseph hardware

 

Can a woman love two men at the same time?

Joseph’s Hardware is the story of Betsy and her lifelong loves of her husband Mark and their high-school friend Ken. While Mark is away on international business, Ken and Betsy build a local business together in rural Vermont and start to see a lifetime of dreams approach fruition, when suddenly Mark is killed in a terrorist attack, and grief chips away at everyone’s confidence for decades.

"Joseph’s Hardware …is a fine inner monologue … a brilliant transition in mood and tone. The last pages are quite moving … It ends where the three’s relationship began – with Guys and Dolls. Very fine writing. Great description and feeling for northern New England and winter and cold. It reminded me a bit of John Updike."– David S. Levenson, Performing Arts Director

Interview with Paul Charles Howell

  • Paperback, 230 Pages
  • Price: $17.46

 

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  • eBook (PDF), 230 Pages
  • Price: $9.38
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The Montreal Olympics


An Insider's View of Organizing a Self-Financing Games



By Paul C. Howell

montreal olympics

 

The 1976 Summer Olympics were the most riveting Games the world had ever seen, but planning efforts in Montreal were complicated by a wilful mayor, an inexperienced head of the IOC, a federal government that stayed at arm's length, and a provincial government split along federalist/separatist lines.

Paul Howell, a planning consultant and key player in the Montreal Olympic Organizing Committee, offers an insider's perspective on how a vast, complex, expensive, and highly politicized event was organized within the constraints imposed by limited resources, an unyielding deadline, and intense pressures from international and local special interest groups. He looks at both the struggles and what went uniquely right in Montreal, setting the record straight on operations, political involvement, and finance, including details of the well-publicized multi-billion dollar deficit that was misrepresented by the press and misunderstood by the public for decades.

For students of organizations the Montreal 1976 Games were a watershed - the first example of a large-scale sports endeavour that applied formal project management using computers as well as critical path planning and scheduling. Focusing on this historic event to illustrate issues of organization, structure, planning, and execution, Howell offers valuable insights not only for those involved in planning Vancouver 2010 and future Games but for anyone involved in ad hoc planning on a massive scale.

Interview with Paul Charles Howell

  • Hardcover: 235 pages
  • Price: $44.95

 

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The Politics of Joy




By Paul C. Howell

Politics of Joy

 

No one could escape the news. TV brought Saigon, Paris, Watts, Prague, Chicago, Detroit, Harlem, and Washington, DC and plunked them down in everyone's life. Everything seemed to emanate from the news-room out. Americans watched their country falter.


They had no confidence in their leaders, exposing them on TV. Yet the stock market boomed. They were starting their affair with computers. But their real love was of sex, so explicit, they thought they were the first to discover it. They worshipped youth, as they sacrificed it on the battle field. They yelled in the streets, singing strident praise of freedom, protest, draft-resisting, love and drugs.

An American Novel of the Presidential Election that beams readers back to the 1968 Presidential election and America's first flirtation with computer projections. Howell casts a chip-set full of characters with too much on the line. Network execs, young and hungry mid-managers, their mini-skirted dolls. In at least two arenas, Howell has the politicians doing their usual avaricious tricks, then TV suits and technicians jumping through hoops with "smak-pak" computer links. "If something did go wrong, he wanted to personally execute Masako and David Schwartz on the spot." Behind the scenes, lush and lascivious romances that ricochet off Vietnam memories, flirt with a new drug culture and suck energy out of Manhattan. Where there was risk, there was adventure. "Antonia made Emery happy, but would she want something he didn't have?" Tricky Dick had strategically discussed all issues… except the war, the cities, civil rights. Humphrey used guerilla tactics to catch up, debate Nixon on left-overs and get McCarthy's endorsement. "Then all hell broke loose when the NES computer stopped counting votes." Elsewhere, while Brinkley and Chancellor droned on, the casual suicide involving a razor blade, "suck'n'all" pills and bourbon. "There's no one I'll miss." In the end, computers talked to each other "even if no one else could." And Nixon won. Was he the only one?

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